Cooking with Sophia – for beginners

Hello Hello!

I’m here to share my favorite recipe. It’s very easy, since I am NOT a good cook. I once had the fire department come to my house sirens-blaring because of my cooking. No joke. Don’t worry! There was no fire! Just a lot of smoke from me trying to follow very well written recipe instructions.  *I apologized profusely and also brought the firefighters doughnuts and coffee the next morning.*

Sophia’s Favorite Recipe

Cup or glass–I prefer a Tervis Tumbler. I’m not a fan of condensation.

Ice–or not.

Vodka–as much as you want

Add whatever beverage you like with vodka–or none at all–it’s great both ways

Grab a book. Relax and Enjoy!

*Please do not drive after consuming this beverage.*



I’m glad you asked. Because my fourth book, UNSPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT released TODAY! And it stars a hot Russian hockey player. So the vodka fits perfectly!!

More Info:


Contemporary Romance.

Random House Loveswept

Sparks fly when a strong-willed Greek girl meets a cocky Russian hockey player on a singles cruise in this story of adventure, forgiveness, and LOVE. Discover why Kelly Jamieson calls the Pilots Hockey series “fun and flirty, warm and sweet.”
Kristen Katsaros wants a life full of adventure and laughter. After a difficult childhood, her motto is to live each day like it’s her last—because it just might be. So when Kristen’s parents send her on a post-grad singles cruise in the Caribbean to meet a Greek husband, she promptly hooks up with the hottest guy she’s ever met. Pasha’s decidedly not Greek, but Kristen gives him a pass because he’s got fun written all over his rock-hard abs.

Pavel Gribov, the cocky playboy of the Detroit Pilots hockey team, can score any girl he wants. But when a teammate drags him on a singles cruise, he can’t resist the chance to help out a drop-dead gorgeous damsel in distress by pretending to be her boyfriend. Before long, the fake fling turns intimate, fueled by something much deeper than lust.

Kristen and Pasha both agree to walk away once the cruise is over, but reality hits like a slap shot when Kristen finds out Pasha lied about everything. Just when she’s ready to start living again, the two stubborn survivors must decide if they can bear to lose the best thing that ever happened to either of them.

Also – I donate the first $500 in my royalties (yes, before I pay myself) to a different charity for each book. I’ve chosen the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation for this book, as my heroine has CF. <3



Buy Links:

Amazon // iBooks // Barnes & Noble // Kobo

Books-A-Million // Google Play


Thank you for letting me indulge in a NEW RELEASE post instead of a real recipe!! Happy Reading! <3

Sophia Henry writes Heartfelt Flirty Fiction featuring hot, hockey-playing heroes. DELAYED PENALTY and POWER PLAY, the first two books in the Pilots Hockey series from Random House Flirt, are available now at all major e-book retailers.


Easy Pot Pie for the Busy Writer!

There is nothing better than a nice warm meal on a chilly autumn night.  However, when you’re in writer mode there’s not a lot of time to spend dallying in the kitchen. Following along with our Bad Girl theme this month, Quick Meals for Writers, I wanted to share one of my easy-to-make, family favorites.

Double Crusted Chicken Pot Pie



2 (9 inch) refrigerator pie crust

1 to 2 packages of pre-cooked chicken (Or you can prepare fresh or cut from a rotisserie Chicken)

1 (16 oz.) can mixed vegetables drained

1 can of cream of chicken soup

½ tsp. of Old Bay seasoning

1/4 tsp. of pepper


Fit one pie crust into the bottom of pie pan (do not bake)

Combine remaining ingredients in a bowl and spoon into pie crust

Place remaining crust on top. Fold edges together. (You can cut off extra crust and fork the edges if you like but the crust is my favorite part, so I fold together)

Cut four slits in the top

Bake at 375 degrees for 45 to 50 minutes!  (Let stand for ten minutes before serving)


There you have it. Easy-Peasy! Stay warm and stay writing!

Remember to Dream Big!


Let’s Run Away Together!

With the hurricane hitting the coast this weekend, I’ve been thinking a lot about storms. There’s the kind of storm that beats on the walls of homes and uproots trees, and the metaphorical kind that rips through our lives and tears apart everything we thought we knew.

Both types of storm are crazy to experience firsthand, and both—if you look hard enough—have a small place of peace right in the center of the chaos.

I remember when I was 12 years old, I sat wide-eyed in my living room floor in South Carolina, surrounded by the warmth of my sleeping bag while Hurricane Hugo passed directly over our house. It hit us at night, for hours pounding against the brick on one side of our home. Then a time of deadly calm surrounded us. There wasn’t even a breeze as we sat waiting for what we knew would come soon, and then it did, hammering the other side of our home until early morning.

Lately I’ve felt like I’ve been living through a different sort of hurricane, the overly hectic life sort of hurricane. As many of you know, the construction at my house started in May and has been unrelenting ever since. Every day there are multiple crews of workers moving around me, and hammering things—always with the hammering of things. And the mess, dear God, the mess.

On top of the construction madness, there’s been my writing life… Bad Girlz of the World, will things in this business ever be simple? I’m pretty sure the answer is no, in fact I’m sure of it. LOL

In this constant fight to navigate my way through the current hurricane of writer life and real life, I’ve been feeling pretty run down, defeated even. I’m someone who likes to have everything in my life neat and organized. I select my clothes for a conference months in advance, I already know what vacations I’ll take in the next 2 years, and the plot of my manuscripts as well as my dinner menus might as well be chiseled in stone. But lately all of my plans and carefully sorted details of life have blown around until they’re unrecognizable, and the effort of keeping things straight has become exhausting.

That was until last week when the wind and rain came to abrupt halt for a day and I finally found the eye of the storm and peace for the first time since spring. It started with a simple text message from Heather McGovern: I need a break. We should run away from home for a night.

Sometimes that’s how times of peace approach us, with a gentle tap on the shoulder or in this case, a text message from a friend, for you to stop and turn around.

Soon we were meeting up in Asheville, NC for a full day andnight of fun!


The construction at my house was still pounding away and I had a deadline for developmental edits on my next book, but for a day McGovy and I laughed, shopped, sipped champagne, ate chocolates, and stopped to sit on the sidewalk with a poet for hire.poet-for-hire

Sure, it was a nice break from reality and a good time with my good friend, McGovy. But more than that, our time away helped me remember that I’m not finding my way through the dark and rainy streets of the writer world or the real world alone. I have a tribe. Not only do I have a family who loves me, I have you, my Bad Girlz. Wherever the wind pushes me tomorrow, next week, or a year from now, I know now that I’ll survive the storm. And so will you!

poemHave you ever survived a hurricane? Which kind? I hope you found the eye of the storm in the middle of the madness.


Sticky Cashew Chicken

About three years ago, I made a switch that would change my life. I did my first Whole 30 and figured out some things about myself. Firstly, the stomach problems I’d had all my life and had been to see numerous doctors about? Yeah. Turns out I’m lactose intolerant. And those daily headaches and weekly migraines I suffered from for years? Yeah. Turns out my body hates sugar.

It’s been a bumpy three years, and while I haven’t always stuck with it as well as I should (and I’ve paid the price), we’ve made big strides to changing our lifestyle. Especially in January when, after watching the documentary Fed Up as a family, we went paleo. Yes, I detoxed my kids from sugar. No, I’m not crazy (most days). For the past ten months, we’ve been following what I call the 90/10 paleo life where we do paleo 90% of the time and cut ourselves some slack the other 10%.

While I could go on and on about how amazing the effects of eating this way are, that’s not what this post is about. This is about quick meals for writers. But. Well. It’s incredibly difficult to find fast meals that are paleo friendly and that aren’t eggs (again).

Enter my favorite meal, ever. It is AHMAYZING. It’s so amazing, I have to make a triple batch every time I make it because that’s how much every single person in my family loves it. And I promise you, even if you’re not paleo, you will gobble up every bite. This recipe is adapted from Juli Bauer’s Paleo Cookbook (my favorite cookbook of all time) because I don’t like to cook with chicken wings and, well, because I had chicken breasts on hand the first time I made this and was too lazy to go to the store.

sticky-cashew-chickenSticky Cashew Chicken
2 pounds chicken breasts, cut into bite size pieces
2-3T arrowroot or tapioca starch
2T coconut oil (may also use olive oil or ghee)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1t fresh grated ginger
1/2c coconut aminos
3T honey
1T chili sauce
Splash of Worcestershire sauce (or fish sauce, if you have it)
2T olive oil (may also use coconut oil or ghee)
3/4c cashews
green onions as desired

  1. Get your sauce going by melting 2T coconut oil in a small saucepan. Add ginger and garlic and cook until fragrant. Then add coconut aminos, honey, chili sauce, and Worcestershire; stir to combine. Bring to a boil, whisking occasionally. Boil until it’s reduced a bit and has thickened.
  2. Meanwhiiiiiile, cut up your chicken, then throw the bits in a gallon ziplock baggie with the arrowroot/tapioca starch and salt/pepper to taste. Toss to coat. (use more starch if needed, but these should just have a dusting, not full coverage otherwise they’ll get gummy)
  3. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan. Once ready, add your coated chicken. NOW THIS IS IMPORTANT: Let the chicken sit, sizzling and popping, until the the chicken starts to turn just a bit white on top. Then flip and repeat! You should have a nice golden crust on all your bitesize pieces.
  4. Once chicken is cooked through and sauce is thickened (it may still be a bit runny), add your crispy chicken to the sauce pan and divvy up. Try to remember other people may want some, too. I know it’s difficult.
  5. Serve over cauliflower rice (or regular rice, if you’re a rebel), and top with desired amount of cashews (lots) and green onions (a few).
  6. Stuff your face.

From start to finish, this recipe takes about 45 minutes and is worth every second spent in the kitchen. Yes, even while on deadline.


Pumpkin Cream Cheese Bars

This rotation, we’re supposed to blog about easy meals for the writer on deadline. But it’s Autumn!!! I want to write about pumpkins. PUMPKIIIIIIIIIIIINS!!!


This is the one time of year I love to bake because it’s time for pumpkin flavored EVERYTHING!!!

I’m trying out a few dessert recipes this year, in order to decide on Thanksgiving’s after dinner treat and for our neighborhood Halloween block party. The other day I modified a recipe from Pinterest and made Pumpkin Cream Cheese Bars. Oh. My. Pumpkin. They’re so good!!! Here’s the simplest recipe ever, go forth and share the Pumpkin spirit throughout the land.

McGovy’s Pumpkinnnnmmmmmmmm Bars

2 cans Pillsbury Crescent Dough

1 can pumpkin puree

1 tsp pumpkin pie spice

1 8oz pkg of cream cheese

6 Tbsp of sugar

1/4 cup brown sugar

tbsp cinnamon

1/4 cup butter

Lightly spray a 9 x 13′ baking dish with cooking spray, and roll out one can of crescent dough. In a mixing bowl, blend together your pumpkin, cream cheese, pumpkin pie spice and 2 tablespoons of sugar. Evenly spread this delicious mixture across the dough. Unroll the other can of dough and place on top. Melt your butter and stir in 1/2 a cup of sugar and a tablespoon of cinnamon. Drizzle this all over the top of the crescent dough, then sprinkle brown sugar over that, to taste. Bake in oven at 350 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes, or until top layer of dough is done. Remove from oven and WAIT. This is the hardest part of the recipe. Let the dish cool a bit or you’ll have a hot mess when you try to slice and serve.


My coworkers preferred their bars cold. I like mine hot, with a cup of coffee. How you devour your Pumpkinnnnmmmm Bars is totally up to you.



Quick Meals for Writers

The header of this post is the theme for the next several blog posts, and when I first saw it I was like, “But my husband does the cooking!” When I thought about it, however, I knew what I wanted to blog about. I’ve been eating more healthfully lately and counting my calories. So I thought I’d share my easy recipe for grilled chicken salad complete with calorie counts. This salad is filling, which can’t always be said of salads, and full of flavor. And it takes only enough time to make it to give me a quick break from sitting at my computer. I can eat it while continuing to work or while I take a short break from work. After I finish eating, it’s back to the computer I go — especially when I have a week like this one stuffed with deadlines that are mere days away.

p1110150But you may be saying it takes time to cut up and grill chicken. Enter the pre-cooked, grilled chicken strips or chunks/cubes in your grocery store’s frozen food section. Tonight I happened to have a tad spicier fajita chicken strips for use in my salad. Having these on hand drastically cuts down on the amount of time assembling this salad takes. I put two tablespoons of Italian dressing in a skillet (the only dressing I use), dial it to slightly about medium heat, and let it cook, flipping occasionally, while I assemble the rest of the ingredients. When I’m done with all the other ingredients, the chicken is ready to go on top. Here’s what I use:

4 leaves of romaine lettuce = 13 calories
4 ounces grilled chicken = 146 calories
2 tablespoons Italian dressing = 60 calories
10 green/Spanish/Manzanilla olives = 50 calories
1/4 cup chick peas/Garbanzo beans = 55 calories
About 1/4 of a chopped, peeled cucumber = 10 calories
A sprinkling of shredded Cheddar cheese = 50 calories
6 cherub tomatoes = 18 calories
TOTAL = 402 calories

p1110152Sometimes I add guacamole, which is an additional 25 calories per tablespoon. You can obviously add or take away whatever ingredients you want; just make sure to watch the calories as some things might have more than you’re expecting.

Happy and healthy eating! Now I’ve got to get back to work. Book due in six days!


A Writer For All Seasons

Yay!!!! Today is officially the first day of fall.

Fall is my very favorite season. As a kid, I probably loved fall because it meant celebrating my birthday. As a work-at-home mom, fall means my own children are back in school and I can write in relative peace. (There are still interruptions, but not quite the INTERRUPTIONS of summer.) I love the fall holidays, the fall wardrobe (comfy sweaters and cute boots!) and the fall weather.

Of course, as I enthusiastically celebrate fall, I have to remember that it’s late spring in the book I’m currently writing. My heroine will look insane if she starts carving jack-o’-lanterns in May.

Writers are frequently “out of season.” Do you know how many times my family has heard Christmas carols blasting out of my office because I’m trying to write a holiday novella in August? I frequently get the date wrong on school notes, checks, etc. Not necessarily because I’ve killed too many brain cells with pinot grigio, but just because there’s so much weird time overlap in my career. In 2016, I’m booking speaking engagements for 2017 and promoting a book I first started writing in 2013. It’s September now, but I just got the cover for my January book, which takes place over Valentine’s Day. (But, really, there’s no wrong time of the year for a cover that looks like this! *heart eyes*)


You may not know this, but every manuscript goes through its own cycle of seasons. A book starts with the bud of an idea, one a writer joyfully nurtures. There’s beauty and hope in this creatively fertile time. Blossom, little story!


Then, as you write pages, those pages become chapters and the story really heats up! Your characters become more real to you–scenes play out in your head, as vivid as a summer blockbuster film. On the best days, writing doesn’t even feel like work. It feels like a vacation from reality.


But things change. Even if you plotted your book ahead of time, there will be forks in the road you didn’t anticipate. The story takes on a life of its own, requiring flexibility on your part. (In worst-case scenarios, a once promising story feels flat and lifeless on the page, requiring problem-solving and revision.) Change is as inevitable as the barrage of pumpkin spice products that hit every autumn. Sometimes it’s a beautiful change–a poignant dialogue exchange you didn’t see coming that makes you cry at the keyboard. Other times, the change is your plot falling apart faster than leaves fall from the trees.


And then…

The winter of authorial discontent, those bleak days when you’re frozen by self-doubt, second-guessing every decision you’ve made. It feels like this in your soul (but less cheery):


You regret having ever started this damn book and realize the Starks totally knew what they were talking about: Winter WAS coming. It has descended upon you, leaving you up to your eyeballs in snowdrifts of uncooperative characters and unwieldy prose.

But don’t panic! This is just the natural life cycle of a book, not a sign that you are a hack who should quit. We must question our books, or how would we make them better? It’s okay to look for ways to improve the story, it’s okay to retrace your steps and find a better path. It’s okay to throw out four chapters (OUCH!) and write four new ones that incorporate all the knowledge you’ve gained about your story and characters along the way. The ice will thaw and your talent will shine through.

Just remember, every season offers something to celebrate and something to learn.

I wish you the happiest of falls and hope you’ll find time to curl up in a comfy sweater with your favorite autumn beverage (pumpkin spice or otherwise) and a good book.


Oh, The Places I’ll Go

Guys, I’m in a rut.*

I’m trudging along with my current book as one does, albeit at a glacial pace. This story has dug its heels in like a recalcitrant toddler. It doesn’t want to be written. I don’t want to write it. The antipathy is rather mutual. I thought today’s blog post would be about inspiration in the hopes that I might find some for my current WIP.

Attribution: RE Hawkins

Attribution: RE Hawkins

When I thought of the inspiration for my works, one thing cropped up again and again: place. Did you know that my first novel after graduating from college was inspired by a trip to the Bird Cage Theater in Tombstone, Arizona? True story. I wrote a historical western about a buckskin wearing heroine who played poker and was falsely accused of robbing the town bank.

No, you may not read it. I’m hoping it’s lost to all posterity.

My first published novel, The Happy Hour Choir, came about as I was contemplating how horrible being named Beulah Land would be if you didn’t live up to heavenly behavior. What really got the book going, however, was seeing a little cinder block bar out in the middle of nowhere. Never once have I visited that bar, but it served as my inspiration for The Fountain.

Book two, Bittersweet Creek, has a setting very near and dear to my heart. Almost none of my readers

A painting of my Granny's House

A painting of my Granny’s House

would recognize the farmhouse that belongs to the Satterfields, but, in my mind, it’s my Granny’s house. I also used several of the outbuildings, including a barn that’s no longer there. The old green house that meant so much to me will now live on in fiction, if not in reality.

Better Get to Livin’ has a unique inspiration in Casey’s Funeral Home in Henderson. Not only have I attended about a bajillion funerals there, but I also used to play “Taps” for military funerals and spent more than one afternoon cooling my jets in the back kitchen. I also included a trailer park in homage to my formative years.

The Ryman Auditorium

My novella, tentatively titled Orange Blossom Special, didn’t take off until I started envisioning places I’d been. I used Knoxville for that one, both the University of Tennessee campus and the old Tennessee Theatre. I also toured Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium over the summer so I could include it. Before I turn in the final draft, I’m going to visit General Neyland’s grave, too.

Gentle reader, as I write about these places, I realize I don’t have one for my current work in progress. Hmmm. Could it be that, in writing to you, I have stumbled upon the solution my problems? Time will tell. In the meantime, what inspires you? What do you do to refill the well? Readers, do you like to read about actual places?

*Funny story: I attended church services at a different church on Sunday, and the preacher included a line about how a rut is “a grave with the ends kicked out.” Kinda inspired me to get out of mine, if you know what I mean.

P.P.S. Important note: I will often write about places that actually exist, but I never intentionally write about people who exist. Any resemblance you might see to someone you know, is completely coincidental. Well, there is the character I quite loosely based on a dead person, but that’s another story for another day.


Editing and Critiques…oh my!

I’m pulling a Carol Burnette and taking questions from the “crowd.” Does anyone else love her as much as me? Or even know who she is? Went With the Wind is my favorite skit ever….YouTube it, people!tumblr_mq5avosuov1qar83lo6_500

Over there in the back, what’s your question?

How do you know when you’re finished editing? It could go on forever!

Yes, yes it could. This is where deadlines help. Unless you not even near the finish line, you’re hitting send to your editor on the due date. That’s a nice, abrupt end to your edit! But, gearing this toward a newer author, I think what you really want to know is when to let go of that manuscript you’ve been working on for months (years)? You query and get a full request from an agent and suddenly you’re convinced your manuscript needs one more pass…and then another. Sending off requested pages or even entering contests can be daunting. Is it ready for prime-time?

I’m going to reference something I heard Eloisa James say, and I apologize that I’m going to have to paraphrase, but basically, she said write the best book you can RIGHT NOW and send it out into the world. This is not to say you shouldn’t study your craft and do your very best, but people (and women especially) aim for perfection and will beat themselves up and hem and haw over every single sentence. Basically, when you are tweaking individual words, you need to let it go.

Here’s the truth: what will get you signed by an agent or your book contracted by an editor is not which verb you picked to use in the last sentence on page seventy-five, it is your VOICE. Is it compelling? Does it draw the reader in and not let them go? Voice matters more than perfect grammar or even plot sometimes. Plot and grammar are fixable; voice is a more elusive creature. (As an aside, I didn’t understand what a dangling participle was until my first editor pointed them out…eek!)

How do you know whether your critique group is helping or hurting?

One thing I’ve learned in the years since I started writing is there is no right or wrong way to approach a manuscript. Some writers I know write 1-3 chapters and send them off to their critique partner or group and wait for feedback before moving on. Some writers have sworn off critique groups/partners.

I fall somewhere in between. I have one critique partner, and I usually “use” her to read projects where I’m stepping out of my usual genre. For most of my manuscripts, I write/edit/turn in without anyone else reading it before my editor, mainly because of those pesky deadlines I mentioned above. Honestly, I usually don’t have the time for someone else to read my manuscript.

My rule of thumb comes from entering somewhere around a million unpublished contests…if the critique makes you feel like crap and question whether or not you should even be a writer, then it has turned toxic. I’ll be honest, some people are toxic by nature. Maybe they’re jealous, maybe they’ve had a bad day, maybe someone kicked their dog when they were eight and they have a vendetta against the world. Who knows?! If the feedback resonates and fires new, better ideas, go for it. But, all feedback is not good feedback. Do a gut check. Basically, if you’re excited about the feedback you get and can’t wait to make your manuscript better, then you have a helpful critique relationship. If the feedback makes you want to cry and instills more doubts than optimism, then move on!

Don’t let your critique group/partner become a crutch, and don’t change something just because someone else thinks you should, even a more experienced writer, which leads into my next point…

It’s important to TRUST your stories and your voice. I queried and signed with an agent and sold two manuscripts without having any critique partners, so I’m proof it’s not necessary for success. I learned early on to trust my method and my voice because I had no choice (aka ignorance is bliss:) There will be many, many times after you get published that you won’t have the chance/time for someone else to pat your head and tell you everything looks good before you hit send. And once your’re published, you have to trust yourself enough to weather rejections and bad reviews, because if you don’t believe in what you’re writing, all those flung arrows from outside sources will eventually kill your joy. Don’t let it!


Paying It Forward

This year’s RWA National Convention in San Diego was one of my favorites I’ve attended for a lot of reasons. To my surprise, one of the highlights of the conference was also one of my biggest sources of stress leading up to it. Namely, teaching a workshop.

To be fair, this wasn’t my first time teaching a workshop. It wasn’t even my first time teaching this workshop. I’d given it for my local chapter and then for a small group at Chicago’s Spring Fling conference. And yet, giving it at Nationals?? That was a whole other ballgame.

It’s hard to believe I attended my first RWA only three years ago. At the time, I was still at the beginning of my career. Every workshop I went to, I sat in rapt attention, soaking up the wealth of knowledge being laid out for me. I was in awe of the people who stood at the front of those rooms, speaking so authoritatively about things I was only just learning. I won’t pretend to be so humble that I never imagined I might someday be up there, doing the same, but it seemed like something for a far-off, distant future. Surely, I could spend decades and still not know enough to be able to pretend to pass that knowledge on.

Funny how time passes.

In the intervening three years, I’ve been to a lot of workshops, both at conferences and at local chapter meetings. I’ve worked with three different editors and a half dozen critique partners, received lots of feedback from readers and reviewers, and spent hours talking with my peers about the intricacies of what we writers do. Basically, I’ve learned a lot.

And in the end, the thing I decided I knew enough about to pass it on to others was one of the things I used to be the weakest at: writing in deep point of view.

I believe it was fellow Bad Girl Tanya Michaels who first gave me the advice that it’s easiest to teach others about topics you once struggled with. If you’ve always been good at something, chances are it came to you naturally, and it’s going to be difficult if not impossible to put your understanding of the skill into words. By contrast, a skill it took hard work and patience to develop? You remember every hard-won inch of that slog. You already know how to explain it to someone else because you know how you wish someone else had explained it to you.

Me in front of the packed house for my Deep POV workshop at Nationals

Me in front of the packed house for my Deep POV workshop at Nationals

So it was that I found myself at the front of a packed auditorium, laying out the wisdom I had gained through years of practice and education to over a hundred people, many of whom were probably at the beginning stages of their careers, listening to me the way I had once listened to others. It was a heady feeling. Look how far I had come.

Look how much good I could do, helping others.

The romance-writing community has always been a special, amazing place, and a huge part of that is the sense of comradery and cooperation. The feeling that we’re all in this together—that one person’s success is not another’s failure, but an opportunity for all of us to learn and grow. Where else do best-selling authors take time out of their day to travel to chapters or present their wisdom and share their stories at conferences? What other genre has such a tradition of writers helping writers?

Paying forward the things I’ve learned from this community has been such an incredibly rewarding experience. I loved getting to share what I’ve learned. I loved the conversations I got to have with the people who came up to me after the workshop. I love feeling like I can give something back after everything this community has given me.

Have you ever thought of presenting a workshop? What topics would you want to teach?


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