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February 2014

Why Be Published?

When I’m not squeezing lemons for never ending glasses of Cajun lemonade (i.e. the Master Cleanse I was nuts enough to embark upon), I’m furiously drafting my newest project, which I’m totally digging. I’m thrilled with the progress and feeling really upbeat—or, call it detox-loopy, if you want to be all cynical about it. Add to this the knowledge that my fellow Bad Girlz are kicking ass and taking names left and right, I thought it would be a great time to present to you a little listicle…..

Ten Awesome Reasons to Become a Published Author (in no particular order ‘cause that’s how I roll)

 

  1. Getting that deal means I could finally sell the true book of my heart: the one I wrote in high school with Depeche Mode as the main characters.

depeche mode

 

 

2.  My students never read anything I assign. Maybe they’d read a book with sex in it?

 

3. I could bring back the term “authoress.” Sounds so much fancier! quill pen

 

4. If I’m antisocial to my neighbors, they’d think it was artistic temperament rather than plain rudeness.

5. The plaque in my town square: “Home of Sydney Carroll.”

6. The satin-upholstered office/boudoir that all romance authors get to use as their work space…..

pink boudoir

7. I could put all of those book covers I doodled in work meetings to good use. I’m sure my publisher would love the input.

8. I could do any damn thing I wanted and call it research.

9. The police would ask me to come help solve murders!

Castle 2

“Wait a minute,” you say. “Where’s the tenth reason? I thought I was going to learn something!” Well, dear readers, that’s where you come in! What would you add to my list?

As always, happy writing!

 

10 Comments

Writing Lessons From My Yoga Mat #2: Progress Comes Slowly. And Then All At Once.

This is the second in an occasional, ongoing series, wherein I look to my developing yoga practice for lessons that can help me grow as a writer.

yogawriter

The first time a yoga teacher instructs you to get into downward-facing dog, it’s awkward. The basic idea is that you’re supposed to make an upside down ‘V’ with your body—hands and feet on the floor, butt in the air. Arms and torso making one straight line all the way from your hands to your hips. Legs straight, too.

yoga pose - downward facing dog

At first, your heels are nowhere close to touching the floor. After about thirty seconds, your shoulders burn. It sucks.

Then you find out it’s supposed to be a resting pose, and you almost fall, you want to laugh so hard. Is rest really supposed to hurt this much?

I’m not even going to lie. Mastering downward-facing dog was a process for me. I spent three or four years slowly getting better and better at it. My shoulder muscles developed to the point where it became easier to hold the pose for longer periods of time, and my flexibility grew, too. Still, the progress was almost imperceptible. Sure, it became less difficult. Sure, my form became better. But there was no way to measure how far I’d come.

Then suddenly, out of nowhere one day, my heels touched the ground.

This may not sound like much to you, but it’s kind of one of the holy grails for the beginning yoga student. (Seriously—have you seen the angle your ankles need to make to have this happen???) But after years of trying–after slow, slow, painfully slow progress, shockingly, I was there.

In writing, the first time you say you want to get published, someone might laugh at you. It’s a crazy, impossible idea. You have to write a book, and edit a book, and put together a query and a synopsis and then actually send those queries to real live people who will judge your work. You have to get requests and then have an agent offer to sign you and then manage to luck out and have that agent actually sell that book.

Chances are, your first manuscript won’t make the cut. You’ll do it all again. And again. And again.

It’s a process. You spend years at it. All the work—the blood, sweat and tears, and the hours away from your family and trying to sneak in writing time when you’re supposed to be working at your paying job—it doesn’t seem to be getting you anywhere. Sure, you’re becoming a better writer. Sure, you’re learning the industry and perfecting your pitch. But there’s no way to measure how far you’ve come.

Then suddenly, out of nowhere one day, you get the call.

Perhaps I’m rambling, but I’m guessing you’ve grasped the parallel I’m drawing by now. In yoga and in writing and in so many other endeavors, the work we put in is hard to measure. It’s grueling and unrewarding and frustrating. But if you put in the time and the effort, it adds up. You may not be able to see the progress, but it’s happening.

So keep trying. Keep working and stretching and reaching. Because, remember: Progress comes slowly.

And then all at once…you’re there.

10 Comments

To Blah With The Blahs!

A fellow Bad Girl and I recently discussed the phenomenon in a writer’s life known as The Blahs. Some call it being stuck in a rut, the doldrums, a bit of ennui. Regardless, it all presents itself with the same symptoms:

You feel like crap about your writing, mainly because you think you are crap and all you write is crap.

bored1-300x240

Here are a few fun Facts about The Blahs:

  1. It’s A LIE. You are not crap and your writing isn’t crap. I do think a healthy desire for improvement makes us better writers and drives us to improve our craft, but don’t go around thinking you’re really crap.
  2. The Blahs are a natural part of the creative process. Painters, actors, dancers, musicians – they all get the Blahs. It’s the flip side of those days when creativity and art spill forth and you’re convinced of your genius.
  3. Severity of symptoms may vary. First case of The Blahs might not be so bad, then a year later you’re hit with the mother of all Blahs.
  4. Writers at every stage of their craft and career come down with The Blahs. No one is immune. You will go through this phase more than once, but it really is a phase. It will pass.

Things that make you susceptible to The Blahs and how to avoid them:

  1. Getting off your writing schedule. Maybe you write a couple of k every day or maybe once a week you knock out 8k and change. It doesn’t matter. If writing is part of your usual habit, then you’ll feel out of sorts when you miss it. Stick to your schedule as best you can so you’re less likely to catch the Blahs.
  2. Real life. Okay, okay – we can’t avoid real life. Just be aware that there is no easier way to come down with The Blahs than when real life throws you a curve ball. LBH, sometimes it straight up nails you in the face. A family member is sick, work gets crazy, friend or family drama – you name it, any of it can quickly make you feel overwhelmed and unsure. Knowing this is the case may help you prepare for sudden Blah onset.
  3. The way this whole writer biz unfolds. You wanted to have that book published by now, but scheduling what it is, it’s going to be out eight months from now. You just knew the agent who requested your partial was going to be your bestie BFF Agent for life, but you haven’t heard a peep in response and it’s been 6 months. You’re under a tight deadline with no time for dawdling. The rush of getting words on the page convinces you it’s page after page of schwill. BAM! You’ve got the Blahs. It’s a crazy biz and nothing will ever change that. Accept it. Own it, live it, love it. This fact will help you endure the Blahs.

ennui

How to cure The Blahs:

  1. Yeeaaah, about that…You can’t. It’s like a cold or flu; it’s going to run its course, like it or not. If you have a deadline, you push yourself through BECAUSE DEADLINE. If you have some leeway, another creative endeavor may help. Read, paint, draw, dance, watch great movies or television, write some flash fiction, distract yourself with pretty things on the internet 🙂 Have fun! Don’t beat yourself up, instead find enjoyment somehow, feed the muse, and look for inspiration. The Blahs will be gone before you know it.

How do YOU deal with the Blahs? What gets you through?

Most writers will tell you, once you’ve gone through The Blahs a couple of times, it really does get easier. You recognize the signs and symptoms and you don’t wallow. Logically, you recognize your writing isn’t crap and this is merely something you must overcome. You’ll get through it AND it will build up your writer immune system for the long run. Trust me, you’re gonna need it.

Just remember: YOU and you’re writing are awesome!

500-days-of-summer-dance-1-o

JGLdance

11 Comments

Giveaway Winners!!!

We’ve been so lucky to have some amazing giveaways here on the blog in the past week. Without further ado, we’re thrilled to announce some of the winners.

Congratulations to:

  • Barbara Elness, who is the winner of a signed ARC of Elizabeth Michels’s upcoming release, Desperately Seeking Suzanna.
  • EmilyD, who won a three book set of books by Grace Burrowes, including The Bridegroom Wore Plaid, Once Upon a Tartan, and The MacGregor’s Lady.
  • And Margaret Smith who won Grace Burrowes‘ generous giveaway of an iPad!

Thank you so much to Elizabeth Michels, Grace Burrowes, and Sourcebooks for making these prizes possible, and to everyone who visited the site and commented to enter. We’ll be in touch with the winners via email to get them their prizes.

Cheers!

champagne-toast

1 Comment

Sketching: The First Stage of Plotting

Confession time – I haven’t plotted a book in over 2 years.

Yes, that’s right.  I said 2 years.

For various reasons, which I won’t try to excuse myself for, my last manuscript took a very long time to complete.  I had good intentions, even started out pulling 1K a day, but things just didn’t work out the way I’d planned.  So here I am, 2 years later, finally querying that manuscript and starting to plot my next.  Yes, I have all those same good intentions, but this time I have one more book under my belt as well.  This means another book of good and bad, tackling dead ends and finding ways out of them, learning my writing strengths and building good habits.  Perhaps this one will go smoother?

But I digress.  This post is not meant as a pep talk or a kick in the ass.  This post is meant to get me moving, and hopefully someone else out there in the same time dimension that I am.  So today we’re talking sketches.

I got the idea of sketching from Karen S. Wiesner’s book First Draft in 30 Days.  If you’re new to writing, or are a pantser looking to turn plotter, this is a great place to start.  The book breaks down the forest into trees, so to speak, which is very important for people like me who think in pieces.  Though I don’t follow everything exactly the way Ms. Wiesner suggests, I found it very helpful in developing my own methods. One of which is sketching.

Sketching in plotting is just like sketching in art.  It’s your first glimpse into what your manuscript is going to look like, more specifically your characters, setting, and plot. Depending on what you write you may use one more than another.  I write character driven stories so my character sketches are pretty elaborate, while my setting sketches are fairly basic.  My plot sketches are almost always developed after I figure out who my characters are; sometimes I don’t have a clue what my plot is until after I define them.

Character Sketches

Character sketches are like a vault that stores all of the important information about your characters.  Mine usually open up with the physical traits:  name, hair color, eye color, height, weight, age etc…  Sometimes I may just list an actor or actress whom embodies that character.  Then I start getting into the social aspects, like their occupation, income level, family status, friends. Anything that gives me a basic image in my head.

Those are the easy things for me to come up with.

Next comes the personality stuff, which I intertwine with past and future.  How did this character become so closed off from the world?  Why does he/she need to change and how?  What conflicts do they face in getting there, both internal and external?  Remember, a person’s past usually defines who they are in the present and can certainly impede whom they want to become.  You need to be sure it all makes sense together.

You can put anything you want in your character sketch; there’s no right or wrong answer here.  Anything that helps you discover your characters.  I usually do sketches for any character with a POV, but some find it helpful to do them for ALL their characters.  I put them all in an excel spreadsheet because yes…I’m that dorky.  I would assume sticky notes work just as good.

Setting Sketches

Setting sketches are similar to character sketches, only — you guessed it — give an image of where your story is taking place.  Are you in a small town or a big city?  On a farm or in a high rise condo?  If the majority of your scenes take place at a farm, jot down what sort of crops are grown or animals are raised.  If it’s in a tiny apartment, make note of what floor they are on (do they hear footsteps constantly?)   These are all details that will help pull your reader into your setting, and shouldn’t be overlooked.

And don’t forget the timeframe and climate!  In my last manuscript, the season became very important to the plotline.  Knowing up front will save you a lot of edits down the line.

Plot Sketches 

And finally – plot sketches.  This is where the backbone of my story begins to take shape.  At this stage I give my story a beginning, turning points, a black moment, a climax, and its end.  This isn’t meant to detail every single second of my manuscript, but more to give me a general direction.  Once I have this defined, I can work on the in between scenes that get me there.  It could be as simple or as detailed as you want at this point.  Mine is usually very vague (as is my explanation), but if you tend to build your plot before your characters, yours could be very detailed.  Just do what works for you.

Between now and my next post, I plan to complete my sketches.  If you’re in the same place as me, give it a try!  If nothing else, you won’t have to hunt for that page where you mentioned your villain’s eye color to be sure of consistency — you can just glance at a file!

Happy Sketching!

Jenna P

8 Comments

Phases of Valentine’s Day!

With tomorrow being Valentine’s Day, the most loved/hated holiday of the year, I thought I’d talk about romance. It is what we do! Have you ever been out to dinner on Valentine’s Day and watched the couples in the restaurant?  People watching, is a favorite pastime which I find very enlightening.

You have the guy who’s obviously getting ready to propose. You can spot him easy enough. He’s the one who seems his collared shirt is about an inch too tight. He keeps adjusting his tie, but it’s obvious his attempt at hyperventilation prevention isn’t working. He listens to his future fiancé as she rambles on, nodding his head obediently, but you know he hasn’t heard a word she’s said. He’s too busy playing out how the next thirty minutes of his life are going to go.  He gulps the over-his-budget Champagne trying to remain calm.

Then you have the couple who have been together for about five years.  The lady has dressed up for the occasion.  She’s in a red dress, sparkly six-inch heels. He’s dressed more casually, Polo and a pair of khakis. Nevertheless, by their exchange of smiles, you can tell the romance is still alive. While they wait for dinner over a glass of wine, he slips her a small red box with a tiny white bow. She blushes, but hurries to open the gift. Of course there’s a heart-shaped necklace inside. Maybe a diamond attached, maybe not.  Still, she’s thrilled.

Then there’s the couple who’s been married between ten to fifteen years. The guy follows all the rules to make his wife happy. Because Hallmark, the florist and the jewelry store commercials have told him what she’s expecting. He’s tolerating dinner when it’s clear; he’d rather be home with a TV tray watching The Amazing Race.  Still, he loves his wife very much, so he makes the effort. The table has no pretty red boxes and certainly no over-priced Champagne. More likely he’s clutching a top-shelf, stiff drink while his spouse sips a fancy martini.

Then there’s that couple that leaves you shaking your head.  She’s got a look of triumph on her face.  I bet you a box of heart-shaped chocolate they had a conversation the week before that went a little like this:

Wife: “Don’t you even think your sorry-butt is going to get out of doing Valentine’s Day. I’d better get some flowers delivered at work. I want a big box of candy, and you’re going to bust into that tight sealed wallet of yours and take me to that new restaurant everyone’s talking about.”

Husband: “Okay.” Shoulders slumped, avoiding eye contact.

You feel sorry for the guy for about a half a second, but not too much because we all know she didn’t just turn into Mrs. B-otch overnight.

Then there’s that adorable couple married for forty-plus years. There isn’t a little box on the table, no over-priced bottle of Champagne crowding them. Sweet tea fills their glasses. Even so, romance encircles them like a halo of bursting love. They have already done the Valentine phases, and they’ve made it through full-circle.  Boy, do they have romance stories to tell, if they could only find someone to listen.

I’m not saying all relationships go through these phases of Valentine’s Day rituals. There are couples out there that get more romantic with every passing year. Like the relationships we write about. 🙂

You may say Lori, what does any of this have to do with writing romance? I say—everything. When you write historical, you research the time period. When you write mystery, you research true crime.

When you write Romance, I suggest you research love. It’s not hard. Just open your eyes and look around. You can learn a lot about relationships by doing a little people watching.

Happy Valentine’s Day Romance Lovers and Always Remember to Dream Big!

Lori

19 Comments

Bad Girl For A Day: Grace Burrowes, Interview + iPad Giveaway!

GraceBurrowes

Pantser or Plotter?

Pantser—by that I mean, I have some idea of my characters’ backstories, and some idea of what’s keeping them apart. Then the begging starts. “Please, Benevolent Universe, may I have an opening scene? No? An opening paragraph? OK, how about an opening line…” Before I turn in for the night, I read over whatever I’ve written that day, and I hope and pray that when I climb out of bed the next morning, I’ll have just one more scene… Nervewracking way to write thirty books, but it’s the only process that has worked for me (so far).

 

What writing book or workshop gave you your biggest A Ha! Or facepalm learning moment?

Donald Maass’s “Break Out Novel Intensive” workshop. Don has taken apart the bestsellers that hang on the lists for months and figured out what makes them tick. A commonsense approach to commercial writing that can lead to brilliant results—though it’s a long and daunting week.

 

What authors are on your auto-buy/borrow list?

Joanna Bourne, Kristin Callihan, Mary Balogh, JR Ward, Carolyn Jewel, Julie Anne Long, Meredith Duran, Tessa Dare, Judith Ivory, Loretta Chase (is that enough?). Love Robert Burns’s poetry and letters. I also read Charles Finch. He writes the Charles Lenox mystery series set in Victorian England—purely scrumptious and full of elegant little historical flourishes.

 

Fave book you had to read in high school English?

Cannot recall liking a single book I “had to read” for high school English, and several of them I regarded as pure anti-adolescent meanness on the part of the English Department. (Mr. Golding, did you simply hate boys?).

 

What’s your signature drink?

I have two. At home, I treat myself to jasmine green tea with agave nectar and whole milk. When hoisting a flagon of libation among good friends, I’ve been known to have a White Russian (or two…).

 

What movie scares the bejeezus out of you?

I do not watch scary movies—a writer’s imagination can be a liability late at night, when the moooon is full.

 

What movie makes you bawl?

The Jungle Book—when Baloo supposedly dies. I know he’s not really, really dead, and yet I choke up every time. Don’t get me started on Old Yeller. And then there’s the scene in Black Beauty when Beauty comes across Ginger all broken down and dispirited… Or the end of The Incredible Journey, when Chance comes limping out of the underbrush…

 

What song do you have to dance/sing along to whenever it comes on?

The Pointer Sisters, “Jump,” or “Neutron Dance,” or “I’m So Excited…” (I’m dating myself!)

 

What’s your fave pair of shoes?

Bare feet, or when it’s cold, a really thick pair of Maggie Moo organic wool socks.

maggie-moo-socks

 

THE MACGREGOR’S LADY BY GRACE BURROWES – IN STORES FEBRUARY 2014

The MacGregor's Lady Cover

What if the steps they take to avoid marriage…

The last thing Asher MacGregor, newly titled Earl of Balfour, wants is a society wife, though he has agreed to squire Boston heiress Hannah Cooper about the London ballrooms. When he’s met that obligation, he’ll return to the Highlands, and resume the myriad responsibilities awaiting him there.

…Lead instead to impossible love?

At her step-father’s insistence, Hannah Cooper must endure a London season, though she has no intention of surrendering her inheritance to a fortune hunter. When she’s done her duty, she’ll return to Boston and the siblings who depend upon her for their safety… or will she? The taciturn Scottish earl suits her purposes admirably—until genuine liking and unexpected passion bring Asher and Hannah close. For if the Scottish earl and the American heiress fall in love, an ocean of differences will keep them apart.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Grace Burrowes hit the bestseller lists with her debut, The Heir, followed by The Soldier and Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal. She has a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, and Lady Sophie’s Christmas Wish was awarded Best Historical Romance for 2011 by the RT Reviewers Choice Awards. Burrowes is branching out into Victorian and contemporary romances with Sourcebooks, as well as short stories. Grace is a practicing family law attorney and lives in rural Maryland. For more information, please visit http:///www.graceburrowes.com.

To purchase The MacGregor’s Lady:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Books-a-Million

iBookstore

IndieBound

Sourcebooks

Discover a New Love 

Grace has two giveaways for today’s post!

Comment for a chance to win an Ipad OR a three books set of The Bridegroom Wore Plaid, Once Upon a Tartan, and The MacGregor’s Lady. (US and Canada only, please.)

Entrants must be residents of the United States or Canada, and must include their email address in order to be eligible to win. Drawing closes at 11:59 p.m. EST on Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Winning entries will be randomly selected using the number generator at Random.org. They will be contacted by email and announced on this blog. Good luck!

Edited February 19, 2014: Thank you so much for your interest in this giveaway. We are now closed to entries. We will announce the winner tomorrow. Again, thank you!

 

193 Comments

Finally!

It's a girl

My first book baby, Must Love Dukes, was born on February 4th! I’ve been celebrating all over town, surrounding states and the internet. So, it’s about time I celebrated with you, Bad Girlz of the world! The first bit of excitement came when I received my author copies in the mail from my publisher…

MLD Selfie

Books! Real books! Books that would soon be on shelves! And soon they were. On release day I went to Barnes and Noble to visit my sweet little book baby. I stood there, sipping my Starbucks, smiling and taking pictures until Mr. Alpha Male finally ripped me away from the M shelf to return home.

MLD in BN

More excitement came this weekend with my first book signing! The event was called, “Stories and Sweets with Elizabeth Michels and Christy English.” Were there sweets? Of course!

cupcakes

And there were stories…

EM speaking

 

CE speaking

 

Christy and I signed books for everyone there…including each other…

Book signing 1book signing 2And then we signed the store’s inventory of our books for anyone who couldn’t make it to the signing on Saturday.  So, if you want a signed copy of Must Love Dukes or Much Ado about Jack, go to Fiction Addiction in Greenville, SC. It was such a great experience, made even better by writer friends who came to enjoy the day with Christy and me.

writer peeps

 

**Special note: Thank you, McGovy for doing a dramatic reading from Must Love Dukes! You were awesome!

It was a fabulous day, but fabulous days aren’t complete without at least one silly photo-op! Here I am selling The Little Monkey a book.  He looks pretty excited, right?!

Monkey book

Thank you for celebrating Must Love Dukes with me! I’ll be partying for the rest of the month until March 4th when Desperately Seeking Suzanna, book baby number 2, is born! And what’s a party without door prizes? Who wants a signed advance reading copy of Desperately Seeking Suzanna?

Click here to enter the giveaway, and don’t forget to leave me a comment!

~ E. Michels

9781402285998-m

The Mad Duke leaned in closer, his lips gently brushing her ear, and whispered, “I dare you.”

She Can’t Resist the Dare…

Lillian Phillips could not imagine how her quiet, simple life had come to this. Blackmailed by the Mad Duke of Thornwood into accepting one wild dare after another…all because of a pocket watch. Desperate to recover her beloved father’s pawned timepiece, Lily did something reckless and dangerous and delicious—something that led to a night she’d never forget.

He has a Reputation for Scandal…

When Devon Grey, Duke of Thornwood, runs into a mesmerizing, intoxicating, thieving woman who literally stole from his bedchamber—with his new pocket watch—Devon plots his revenge. If the daring wench likes to play games, he’s happy to oblige. After all, what’s the ruse of being the Mad Duke if you can’t have some fun? But the last laugh might just be on him…

For buy links click here.

30 Comments

Bitching About Books: THAT’S The End???

sheldon-throwing-papers

I’ve been a voracious reader since early childhood, back when all writing meant to me was holding a fat pencil in my hand and laboriously printing out block letters in never-ending repetition. Now that I’ve mastered the alphabet and focused my skills on stringing those letters together into something publishable, I find that a lot of what I read is filtered through a writer’s viewpoint. I imagine this is the case for a lot of other writers, too. Thus, Bitching About Books was born: an occasional series discussing elements of fiction from both perspectives. I’d love to discuss different tropes or trends we find in the course of our personal reading that interest, intrigue, or irritate us.

One thing that hits on all three is something I’ve seen a lot of lately: the non-ending. Sometimes, it’s just abrupt, like the author just decided she had enough words and X’ed out the old Word document. Other times, it’s drawn out, and the mainplot element is never resolved. I’ve seen this the most in literary novels. As a reader, I’m all:  WTH, it’s over? And I never found out the secret? Seriously? I’ve read a couple of literary mysteries (mysteries!) where this happened…..600 pages and the little girl never did find out who killed her older brother. Or the one where the journalist tracks the cult filmmaker down to the ends of the earth (like, literally—Tierra del Fuego or some shit), and then he knows he will finally hear the truth. He does, but you don’t. That’s because it ends.

 

As a writer, I don’t care for it, either. I feel like I owe it to the characters and my readers to craft a story that ends in a satisfying way. Not necessarily happily, or overly tied up in a neat package with even the problems of the secondary characters handily solved—but something that makes sense in the world I’ve built. I love a slightly ambiguous ending. The main plot has been resolved, but there’s room for interpretation. Done well, it gives a feeling of reality to the characters; that they exist in the world of the story, and will go on after our time with them draws to an end. Personally, I feel like I have a contract with my reader: they’re taking time that they could be spending doing something else, and are investing it in your writing. If I’m lucky enough to have readers who care about what happens next, I’m not going to short-change them. In some genres, you can get away with it….but could you imagine a romance where the hero and heroine didn’t get together at the end, or a mystery where the detective still had no idea who the killer was? I imagine there wouldn’t be too many readers begging to buy your next book. A series can be a special case, but for the love of God, please tell the reader first—and preferably have Book Two out or on the way.

 

Some people might defend the non-ending as being true to life. At times, life is random, nonsensical, and unsatisfying—no argument there. But here’s the thing: fiction isn’t life. It’s a world we create from a premise. For a reader to believe in that premise, it should make more sense than life does.

 

So, what do you think? Are there nice and neat endings you’ve hated? Ambiguous ones you’ve loved? Non-endings that did feel satisfying? And what about as writers? Have you ever tried to do a non-ending? How did it work out?

Happy reading (and writing),

Syd

 

8 Comments

Grace Burrowes’ visit is February 12th – Win an iPad!

Please stop by the Bad Girlz Write Blog on Wednesday, February 12th when our Bad Girl For A Day is New York Times and USA Today Best Seller Grace Burrowes.

There will be 2 giveaways with her visit! Comment for a chance to win an Ipad OR a three books set of The Bridegroom Wore Plaid, Once Upon a Tartan, and The MacGregor’s Lady. (US and Canada only, please.)

The MacGregor's Lady Cover

THE MACGREGOR’S LADY BY GRACE BURROWES 

IN STORES FEBRUARY 2014

What if the steps they take to avoid marriage…

The last thing Asher MacGregor, newly titled Earl of Balfour, wants is a society wife, though he has agreed to squire Boston heiress Hannah Cooper about the London ballrooms. When he’s met that obligation, he’ll return to the Highlands, and resume the myriad responsibilities awaiting him there.

…Lead instead to impossible love?

At her step-father’s insistence, Hannah Cooper must endure a London season, though she has no intention of surrendering her inheritance to a fortune hunter. When she’s done her duty, she’ll return to Boston and the siblings who depend upon her for their safety… or will she? The taciturn Scottish earl suits her purposes admirably—until genuine liking and unexpected passion bring Asher and Hannah close. For if the Scottish earl and the American heiress fall in love, an ocean of differences will keep them apart.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Grace Burrowes hit the bestseller lists with her debut, The Heir, followed by The Soldier and Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal. She has a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, and Lady Sophie’s Christmas Wish was awarded Best Historical Romance for 2011 by the RT Reviewers Choice Awards. Burrowes is branching out into Victorian and contemporary romances with Sourcebooks, as well as short stories. Grace is a practicing family law attorney and lives in rural Maryland. For more information, please visit http:///www.graceburrowes.com.

To purchase The MacGregor’s Lady:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Books-a-Million

iBookstore

IndieBound

Sourcebooks

Discover a New Love

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